Like What You're Reading? Submit your email to be notified of new articles! Really Simple Syndication

Homes For Sale

Real Estate Info

Real Estate Market Update Anne Arundel County, Maryland – August 2013

Anne Arundel County Real Estate – August 2013

We all know that market conditions for real estate are local . Statistics we hear quoted on TV, see printed in the media, or posted online regarding home sales on a national level don’t reflect every single real estate market across the country. In the back of our minds, we can’t help thinking “Okay, but what’s happening with real estate in MY back yard?”

You’ll be glad to know, as an Anne Arundel County home owner, that the residential real estate market in this area has experienced a turn-around over the past few months that is very favorable to you. In fact, sales statistics from our regional multiple listing service (MRIS) have been better for home owners and sellers in recent months than we’ve seen in the same month during previous years – in some case, for as long as the past five years.

Let me share with you the statistics I watch each month.  These numbers are county-wide (Anne Arundel) for August 2013, compared to August 2012. If you’d like to see numbers that are even more local, ask me for a zip code analysis.

Crystal ball croppedBALANCE:

Closed Sales: 683 - up 25% from 545
Pending Sales (under contract):  1250 - up 2% from 1223
New Listings: 900 - up 20% from 745

Balance is probably the closest thing to a crystal ball that we have in real estate for predicting the future, because it addresses the question of supply and demand.  There have been many months over the past few years when new listings were double the number of pending sales, but now we see home sales closing at a 5% faster rate than new listings are coming on the market. Yay!

PRICE:

Median Price of Closed Units:  $320,000 - up 3% from $310,000

Median is the middle sale price, with an equal number of higher and lower priced homes. Most housing analysts consider to be a more accurate indicator than Average Price.

Average Price of Closed Units: $367,111 - down less than .2% from $367,710

Detached homes: up 2%
Attached homes: up 5%

Average is determined by dividing the total sales volume by the number of closed homes.

 DAYS ON MARKET:

75 days - down 27% from 103 days

SOLD vs. ORIGINAL LIST PRICE:

94.5% - up 2% from 92.4%

If you’d like to see the numbers for your own zip code, let me know.  I’ve maintained a chart of real estate statistics going back to 2005 for most Crofton area zip codes, so you can follow the ups and downs of the real estate market by month or year or both.
I’m happy to provide this information to local home owners at any time, even if you’re not thinking of selling in the near future.  Sometimes, it’s just good to know the value of your home.

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

About Focus on Crofton:

FocusonCrofton.com is my way of attracting relocating homebuyers to the greater Crofton area while keeping current residents updated about local real estate, news, and events. Please click on Contact Margaret Woda if you would like to see information about your community organization or local event posted on FocusonCrofton.com or our Facebook page.

__________ SEARCH CROFTON HOMES ONLINE__________

Posted by Margaret Woda | | Discussion: No Comments »

What are the Electrical Energy Users in Your House?

What are the Electrical Energy Users in Your House?

By Jay Markanich, Real Estate Inspector – Activerain.com 9/13/2013

The question might better be put “who…” but you should ask yourself, what are the electrical energy users in your house?

We all have choices.  Sometimes we don’t have a choice as regards energy, but in many ways we can choose to use energy or not.  We can save energy too. For example, we can try to replace older things with newer things.  Older things, and we’ll get into this, typically use more energy than newer things.

What things?

Our electrical use is measured in terms of kilowatts.  A kilowatt is 1,000 watts per working hour.

Electrical things are absolutely necessary.  We all have them!

Sometimes electrical power used all the time, like your fridge for instance.  Other things only when we turn them on.  Then there are those things that continue to use energy even when turned “off.”  Those are called Energy Vampires, and we’ll talk about those later.

You can pick your poison when looking for energy-use pie charts.  I have this one on my website.  They vary somewhat.

These are the top six electric energy users found in most American houses, followed by their watt usage per hour.  The watt calculations for everything in this post come from General Electric.

1.  Electric furnace 17,221
2.  Central air conditioner 5,000
3.  Dryer 3,400
4.  Oven 2,300
5.  Dishwasher 800
6.  Water heater 479

But there are a multiplicity of electrical things we use in our houses every day!  This will vary from house to house, of course.  But as Americans our personal energy use grows every year.  How many computers and TVs did you have in your house 25 years ago, and how many do you have now?

Typically savings come from technological advancement.  That’s what we do as Americans!  We make things more efficient!  As we do people can save money.  So it really does pay to get newer things, generally speaking.  Some new things use MORE energy!

Here is the wattage use for appliances most people will have in their houses:  hair dryer 1,538, coffee maker 1,500, microwave 1,500, iron 1,100, toaster 1,100, and vacuum cleaner 650, freezer 273.

Some electric users most people have but don’t use so much wattage per hour include video games 195, DVR 33, cable TV box 20, DVD 17, wireless router 7 and cordless telephone 3.

Energy Star suggests that some electrical appliances are Energy-Use Vampires.

Basically these energy vampires include anything with a light that’s on all the time!

The light indicates there is stand-by power being used.

I have them, you have them, we all have them!  A couple of things that most people might not consider would include the garage-door opener, satellite dish, smoke detectors and security systems.

Many of us consider those things to be necessary!  And much of the things we have that draw stand-by power we probably consider to be necessary too.

But, some vampires, like charging cords, can be unplugged.  And things plugged into power strips can be turned off.

What about old versus new?

Some new things save energy and some do not.  For example, an old refrigerator (older than 1995) can use as much as 1,400 watts per hour.  These are plugged in all the time, so they can be expensive.  My power company charges me $.09 per kilowatt, so that old fridge could cost me $1,226 per year in electricity!  A new fridge, by comparison, regular kitchen size, uses about 188 watts, and costs around $70 per year.  That is a DRAMATIC savings!  So, don’t put that old fridge in the basement or garage!  It’s better to donate it to a charitable organization and buy a new one – you will break even really quickly!

A 60 watt incandescent light bulb uses, oh, 60 watts per hour!  A CFL 60 watt equivalent about 18 watts.  There are drawbacks to switching, but in terms of pure energy the CFL will save power.

What new things use more energy?  Remember the stand-by light?  New, flat-screen TVs use huge amounts of energy compared to the older TVs.  An old TV used about 150 watts, and if turned on 5 hours a day would cost $27/year.  The new flat screens?  About 339 watts, for an annual cost of $62 for those same 5 hours!  How many do you have in your house?

That’s why the stand-by appliances are called vampires!

Of course you’re asking – my computer and printer are on a lot.  What does it cost me?

A tower computer uses about 150 watts, a monitor 150 and printer 50.  If they are on 8 hours a day together they’re costing you about $90/year.  A laptop, by comparison, uses only 50 watts, so it saves a lot of electrical energy, costing only about $15/year.

My power company has an energy-use calculator.  Yours might too.  Just plug in your kilowatt charge, look up the watt usage of the electrical appliance, and figure it out!

My recommendation:  we are all managers.  We manage ourselves, our homes and our lives.  In terms of energy use we can all be better managers!  And after all, no one reaps the savings for smarter energy use but us!  That’s ALL of us!

Thank you for sharing this informative post, Jay!

Posted with permission from Jay Markanich.  Visit Jay’s website for more information.

Posted by Margaret Woda | | Discussion: No Comments »

Crofton’s 50th Anniversary House Tour

Crofton Village Garden Club will again host a Holiday House Tour in December, and this year’s event will help kick off the Crofton 50 Year Anniversary Celebration that will run through 2014.

The club is accepting nominations for well-maintained homes throughout the 21114 zip code that will represent each decade since Hamilton Crawford developed the area now known as “Old Crofton” in 1964.  Since that time, Crofton has expanded well beyond those brick gates with a variety of single family and town house communities that now sell at price points unimagined in those early days.

Please nominate your home or a neighbor’s home to be included on the 2013 Holiday House Tour, if it is well-maintained, recently updated, and will be decorated for the holidays before the tour date of December 15. Simply click on the CONTACT tab at the top of this website, and someone from the garden club will contact you in the next few days.

Time is of the essence, because the list of homes will be finalized in September.

P.S. As a real estate agent, I just have to point out that it couldn’t hurt for you to say “Featured on Crofton’s 50th Anniversary House Tour” when you’re ready to sell your home.

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

About Focus on Crofton:

FocusonCrofton.com is my way of attracting relocating homebuyers to the greater Crofton area while keeping current residents updated about local real estate, news, and events. Please click on Contact Margaret Woda if you would like to see information about your community organization or local event posted on FocusonCrofton.com or our Facebook page.

__________ SEARCH CROFTON HOMES ONLINE__________

Posted by Margaret Woda | | Discussion: No Comments »

Crofton Georgetown Homes in High Demand

Crofton Georgetown Homes 

Three of the four most recent closings in this beautiful neighborhood were my listings, and I am happy to report that two of them went under contract in a day and the third sold in a week.  Much as I would like to claim all the credit for these results, the home owners deserve a lot of credit for their well-maintained homes and the time invested in preparing their homes for sale. And we all know about the importance of location, location, location – not to mention the standard features in these popular townhouses.

History of Crofton Georgetown Houses

The Crofton Village Green, Crofton Country Club, and approximately 470 homes were built in the new community of Crofton between 1964 and 1966.  159 of these new homes were in The Crofton Georgetown Homes, located at the intersection of Crofton Parkway and Duke of Kent Street. When these colonial style townhouses were first offered by Hamilton Crawford, standard features included hardwood floors on the main living levels, heat lamps in the bathrooms, central vacuum systems, pantries off the kitchen, an open concept layout between the dining room and kitchen, and stairs with a low rise and wide tread.  Many of the homes were brick, and most of them included a basement.

Crofton Georgetown Homes Today:

There are three separate regimes in the Crofton Georgetown Homes, each with its own governing board and covenants.  Regardless of the regime, outstanding maintenance of the public areas is a hallmark of the community and one of the things which attract new home buyers.

Elementary school students can walk to nearby Crofton Elementary, and Anne Arundel County school buses transport the older children to Crofton Middle School and Arundel Senior High School.

There are three models:

WARBURTON is larger than many single family homes, with 3,000 sq. ft. including the basement. This model is a four bedroom, 2.5 bath colonial with a partially finished basement which may or may not include another half or full bathroom.  It originally featured a center foyer, formal dining room, a large formal living room and a family room on the main level. Today, you’re likely to find the a Warburton with the kitchen and dining room combined, as they were at 1736 Dryden Way.  This home sold in 2013 at $328,000, after a low appraisal forced the price down from the original contract price.  Since then, another Warburton closed at $339,000.

CARLYLE is the smallest model in the community, with almost 1900 sq. ft. including a basement, but some of the earliest Carlyle’s did not have a basement. This model is a two or three bedroom home, with one full bath upstairs and a half bath on the main level. A Carlyle, with basement, sold in 2013 for $283,000.

THORNTON is large town home, nearly 2500 sq. ft., with three bedrooms, 2.5 baths, and a full basement. As you step inside the door, you can see all the way through to the back windows and beyond – which creates a very open and spacious feeling. The two most recent sales for this model (as of August 25, 2013) were $299,000 and $280,000.  Both homes were in excellent condition; the price variance reflects the difference in updating and added features such as a stone fireplace and 3rd full bath in the more expensive home.

There are a few homes in this community that feature a different layout, with the kitchen in front overlooking the parking lot rather than the patio.  I can’t say for sure if these homes were alternate layouts to the Thornton and Carlyle or if they had a different name.  I’m only aware of about  five of these in the entire community.

If you’re interested in buying a home in the Crofton Georgetown Homes, don’t wait for one to come on the market.  Contact me today so I can let you know about any upcoming listings BEFORE they become public knowledge!

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

About Focus on Crofton:

FocusonCrofton.com is my way of attracting relocating homebuyers to the greater Crofton area while keeping current residents updated about local real estate, news, and events. Please click on Contact Margaret Woda if you would like to see information about your community organization or local event posted on FocusonCrofton.com or our Facebook page.

__________SEARCH CROFTON HOMES ONLINE__________

 

Posted by Margaret Woda | | Discussion: No Comments »

Landscape your home to sell – 5 Tips to Sell Green

If you saw Landscape Your Home to Sell – 5 Tips to Sell Green on Bankrate.com, you already know that this Crofton real estate agent was one of the “experts” quoted throughout the article.  If you missed it, please allow me to share my 15 minutes of fame.  Just click on the link at the beginning of this paragraph.

The importance of curb appeal to a home sale and final sale price cannot be underestimated.  If you do nothing else to prepare your home for sale, focus on curb appeal because it could mean the difference between a prospective buyer coming into the property or driving past to look at other homes. Buyers may never know you have a fabulous home interior, if the outside doesn’t say to them, “Honey, Stop the Car.  I want THAT one!”

The advice I give to sellers for preparing their home to sell is exactly the same, whether we’re talking about the interior or exterior: De-Clutter, Clean, Repair, Neutralize, and Stage.  Let me explain how this advice applies to curb appeal with this 1-minute YouTube Video, which features several Crofton homes.

About Focus on Crofton:

FocusonCrofton.com is my way of attracting relocating homebuyers to the greater Crofton area while keeping current residents updated about local real estate, news, and events. Please click on Contact Margaret Woda if you would like to see information about your community organization or local event posted on FocusonCrofton.com or our Facebook page.

__________ SEARCH CROFTON HOMES ONLINE__________

listings. Margaret Woda

Posted by Margaret Woda | | Discussion: No Comments »

Copyright © 2007 Focus On Crofton     Agent Login    IDX Login     Design by Real Estate Tomato     Powered by Tomato Blogs

Margaret Woda on Zillow
My Davidsonville Real Estate Listings